parents and guardians views on the acceptability of a future covid 19 vaccine a multi methods CORD-Papers-2022-06-02 (Version 1)

Title: Parents and guardians views on the acceptability of a future COVID-19 vaccine: a multi-methods study in England
Abstract: Background The availability of a COVID-19 vaccine has been heralded as key to controlling the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 vaccination programme success will rely on public willingness to be vaccinated. Methods We used a multi-methods approach - involving an online cross-sectional survey and semi-structured interviews - to investigate parents and guardians views on the acceptability of a future COVID-19 vaccine. 1252 parents and guardians (aged 16+ years) who reported living in England with a child aged 18 months or under completed the survey. Nineteen survey participants were interviewed. Findings Most survey participants reported they would likely accept a COVID-19 vaccine for themselves (Definitely 55.8%; Unsure but leaning towards yes 34.3%) and their child/children (Definitely 48.2%; Unsure but leaning towards yes 40.9%). Less than 4% of survey participants reported that they would definitely not accept a COVID-19 vaccine. Survey participants were more likely to accept a COVID-19 vaccine for themselves than their child/children. Participants that self-reported as Black Asian Chinese Mixed or Other ethnicity were almost 3 times more likely to reject a COVID-19 vaccine for themselves and their children than White British White Irish and White Other participants. Survey participants from lower-income households were also more likely to reject a COVID-19 vaccine. In open-text survey responses and interviews self-protection from COVID-19 was reported as the main reason for vaccine acceptance. Common concerns identified in open-text responses and interviews were around COVID-19 vaccine safety and effectiveness mostly prompted by the newness and rapid development of the vaccine. Conclusion Information on how COVID-19 vaccines are developed and tested including their safety and efficacy must be communicated clearly to the public. To prevent inequalities in uptake it is crucial to understand and address factors that may affect COVID-19 vaccine acceptability in ethnic minority and lower-income groups who are disproportionately affected by COVID-19.
Published: 2020-10-19
Journal: Vaccine
DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.10.027
DOI_URL: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.10.027
Author Name: Bell Sadie
Author link: https://covid19-data.nist.gov/pid/rest/local/author/bell_sadie
Author Name: Clarke Richard
Author link: https://covid19-data.nist.gov/pid/rest/local/author/clarke_richard
Author Name: Mounier Jack Sandra
Author link: https://covid19-data.nist.gov/pid/rest/local/author/mounier_jack_sandra
Author Name: Walker Jemma L
Author link: https://covid19-data.nist.gov/pid/rest/local/author/walker_jemma_l
Author Name: Paterson Pauline
Author link: https://covid19-data.nist.gov/pid/rest/local/author/paterson_pauline
sha: 453e154e3a9467fb645bbb87b4b1027eef49ba94
license: els-covid
license_url: https://www.elsevier.com/about/policies/open-access-licenses/elsevier-user-license
source_x: Elsevier; Medline; PMC
source_x_url: https://www.elsevier.com/https://www.medline.com/https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/
pubmed_id: 33109389
pubmed_id_url: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33109389
pmcid: PMC7569401
pmcid_url: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7569401
url: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X20313219?v=s5 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33109389/ https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.10.027 https://api.elsevier.com/content/article/pii/S0264410X20313219
has_full_text: TRUE
Keywords Extracted from Text Content: COVID-19 people COVID-19 vaccine participants women COVID-19 vaccine
Extracted Text Content in Record: First 5000 Characters:Parents' and guardians' views on the acceptability of a future COVID-19 vaccine: a multimethods study in England 167 and "likely to reject" (those that answered No, definitely not or Unsure but leaning towards 168 no). 180 of interest such as underrepresented populations in the survey (e.g. participants from ethnic 181 minority groups or reporting a lower household income) and/or indicated they would likely 182 refuse a COVID-19 vaccine, for their child or themselves. We did not solely interview 183 participants who were likely to refuse a COVID-19 vaccine as we were keen to explore the 184 nuances of reasons participants had for accepting or refusing a COVID-19 vaccine. 186 Participants were emailed an information sheet, fully detailing the study objectives and 187 explaining all aspects of participation, including the right to withdraw from the research. 188 Written informed consent was obtained from each participant. Interviews lasted Parents' and guardians' views on the acceptability of a future COVID-19 vaccine: a multimethods study in England 213 INSERT TABLE 1 HERE 214 215 43.3% of survey participants (n=530) provided their details to be contacted for a follow-on 216 interview. In total, 61 parents were contacted to participate. Of these 19 took part in 217 interviews (18 women and one man), 39 did not respond to recruitment emails, two 218 responded initially but did not follow through with an interview. The characteristics of 219 interviewees are outlined in Table 2 ). Interestingly, one interviewee (#19) that was leaning 249 towards accepting the vaccine at the time of completing the survey discussed that she was 250 leaning towards refusing the vaccination (for herself and her child) at the time of interview. 251 252 The following reasons were given for COVID-19 vaccine acceptance for self and for 253 child/children, in order of how often they were mentioned by survey participants and 254 importance to interviewees. 255 To protect self and others 256 Of survey participants expressing positive intentions to vaccinate and leaving an open-text 257 response, the most prevalent reason was to provide protection from COVID-19 to the Parents' and guardians' views on the acceptability of a future COVID-19 vaccine: a multimethods study in England 259 protecting other people (for self: 23.7%, n=213; for child: 19.5%, n=180), including family 260 members (for self: 12.2%, n=109; for child: 5.3%, n=49). Participants also reported that they 261 would vaccinate to protect someone known to them in a risk group for COVID-19 (for self: 262 8.2%, n=74; for child: 3.1%, n=29). 5.0% (n=45) of survey participants specifically mentioned 263 that they wanted to receive the vaccine to stay healthy to look after their child/children. . This is of concern given the evidence that Black, Parents' and guardians' views on the acceptability of a future COVID-19 vaccine: a multimethods study in England 668 669 670Parents' and guardians' views on the acceptability of a future COVID-
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